If you have been blaming yourself for the death of your loved one, or feeling guilty that you didn’t do something you “should” have done, you are not alone. Whether your special person died by suicide, an overdose, long-term illness or suddenly, self-blame often appears. Guilt and shame are heavy burdens to bear, and add more suffering on top of our broken heart. Learn how to manage these difficult emotions in episode 31.


Kim Colegrove is the founder of the PauseFirst Project, which offers Mindfulness for First Responders, and was founded in honor of her husband, Special Agent David M. Colegrove, who died by suicide in 2014. Kim learned the practice of transcendental meditation at the age of ten. After her husband’s death, Kim used her practice to cope with her own grief and loss. Now, with more than 40 years of practice under her belt, she is helping police, firefighters, EMS, paramedics, dispatchers, corrections officers, and other first responders cope with the daily stress and trauma of the job. 


At the age of 38, Claire Hoffman became a widow when her husband experienced a drug overdose. A mother of one, Claire describes this event as having a butterfly effect over her entire world. In an effort to cope with the loss and gain wisdom and insight, Claire has gathered together grief experts from around the world for the Liberate Your Grief Spotcast, a 5 day event offering hope and healing to anyone who has experienced a major loss.


Heather Stang interviews David A. Treleaven, Ph.D., author of “Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness,” for an closer look at the intersection of grief, trauma and mindfulness, so you can understand the benefits and pitfalls before you practice. Mindfulness meditation is highly praised for helping people reduce physical, emotional, and psychological suffering. But when trauma is involved, mindfulness needs to be handled with care, modified, or outright avoided.