Seeing Death in a New Light

By Looking through a New Lens

I was fortunate to be introduced to some reading materials recently that covered topics on metaphysics and past life therapy. I had little expectation that the information it contained would comfort me as much as it did. I started to read about the evolution of the soul and how amazingly, the same souls will often travel together, which had a profound impact on my outlook on death and life itself.

When I was 13 years old, my father passed away. I was coming back from a friend’s house.  I remember stepping out of the car and peering out at all the shadowed faces of family members on my front steps that night. My father had had a long struggle with abusing drugs that ended in September of 2009. That same day, before I left my house, I remember exchanging a not-so-pleasant conversation with my father, who was high in the bathroom and trying to talk to me. I was 13 years old and fed up with his addiction so I naturally gave him my pre-teen attitude and bitterly left the house without looking back.  After his death, this scenario would occasionally make its way into my thoughts. I felt guilty that our last exchange was such a horrible one and I had so wished our last memory together was one where he was sober.

As someone who has lost a loved one, I understand that everything that has happened, has happened. However, when participating in metaphysics and past life therapy, I learned that there is so much more that is going to happen. Most significantly,  I have discovered that the souls of the people around you often travel beside yours in past lives and future lives to come.  This concept has given me tremendous comfort in coping with my father’s death. Feeling regretful for the things I did not do or say to my father has thankfully lessened as a result. To know that one day in another life, our souls might dance together or laugh together again creates a new light inside of me.

I feel as though the information I’ve learned from studying reincarnation and our existence can aid us all in accepting death in a new way.

Jena Vandenberge

Jena is a 22-year-old with a passion for writing.Her personal family experiences with coping with the loss of her father have influenced her to want to help others with her writing.When she's not writing, Jena works with children as a co-teacher in a pre-school classroom in New York.
Jena Vandenberge

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