An Eye For an Eye? I have often told my students at Utica College that karma isn’t about an eye for an eye or a tooth for a tooth. If that was true, we’d all be blind and eating our meals through a straw. For someone like me, who tends to value sacred law as


Last year, my husband Steve died. His death changed my life in an instant. We were childhood sweethearts. I was 13 when we met and he was 14. He made a commitment to love me forever and that’s exactly what happened until the day he died. We had 38 years of marriage and an exciting


I write to think about questions that are preoccupying me. In my novel Landslide, I consider how resilience arises out of catastrophic loss. When I started the novel, my mother and three close friends had died. My husband had battled cancer. I had gone through unexplained, early menopause which also felt like sorrow and loss.


Major Griffith, USMC, was killed in action on December 14, 2011 by an enemy Taliban sniper. Sam was a beloved Marine Corps Officer who embodied perseverance and grit. His death greatly impacted the lives of all that knew and loved him and changed the course of Renee’s life forever. When Sam died, I realized I


Almost everyone experiences bereavement and grief at some stage in their lives, yet no one experiences it in the same way. We are all different in the way we respond. In the midst of grief, it is difficult to accept intended words of comfort such as “I know how you feel.” Such words always sound


Though it has been almost five years, I remember clearly the moment my father’s spirit slipped from this physical plane into the great unknown. Even though he had been ill for some time, until that moment I had denied the fact that his death was on the horizon because I knew—in the darkest places of


Your first Thanksgiving without your loved one is approaching, and you may not know how to manage grief during  the holidays. Before the loss, we expected to spend quality time with the people we love. This time of year means we engage in traditions that bring out our inner child, and foster a sense of


My friends and clients often share stories with me about signs from deceased loved ones. And then they ask, “Are they real?” I don’t pretend to know what happens to our loved ones when they die. But I do know that those of us left behind take great comfort in maintaining the connection with the