Notice if your inhales are equal in length to your exhales, or not. Notice if it is easy to focus on your breath, or not. From “Breathing Exercises for Grief & Stress” More on Mindfulness & Grief 


Bring your awareness to your breath without changing its natural flow. If it is shallow, notice shallow. If you feel tightness in your body when you inhale, notice that. From “Breathing Exercises for Grief & Stress” More on Mindfulness & Grief  Save


                        Breathing exercises will deepen your connection to your body and help you bring conscious awareness to the present moment. Tension in your body will release, and your mind can take a break from worrying about the past or future, which is often a


                        Breathing exercises are one of the most helpful things you can do when you are grieving or stressed. From “Breathing Exercises for Grief & Stress” More on Mindfulness & Grief 


                        Don’t breathe in any special way right now. Just get to know your natural rhythm in this moment. What do you notice about your breath? From “Healing Grief in the Body with Gentle Awareness” More on Mindfulness & Grief 


                        Imagine you could approach yourself right now with loving compassion (If loving compassion feels too edgy right now, at least imagine seeing yourself through neutral eyes). From “Healing Grief in the Body with Gentle Awareness” More on Mindfulness & Grief 


                         Can you imagine what it might be like to give your body a time out from holding all that stress? You can, and it only takes a few minutes to learn from your body. From “Healing Grief in the Body with Gentle Awareness”


                        While your body thinks it is doing you a favor by protecting you, in reality it is most likely causing more aches and pains by holding onto tension. From “Healing Grief in the Body with Gentle Awareness” More on Mindfulness & Grief


                        When your heart aches the perspective on life narrows; the panorama of a once full life zooms in to the detail of suffering, and the body closes in on itself in an attempt to protect the heart from further pain. From “Healing Grief in


                        We have to have support, we have to get to know ourselves better, and we have to envision (and eventually act) on the reconstructed life after loss. From “6 Mindful Strategies to Recover from the Shock of Loss” More on Mindfulness & Grief